NoDAPL Protest Home | Images | Who Were The Protesters?

There were thousands of people who left comments online or harassed the citizens of North Dakota. There were also protesters who were prolific in what they said online. These albums highlight some of these people and what they said or advocated during this protest. They also show certain individuals who chose to be "keyboard warriors", a type of activist that no doubt played a big role in this protest as far as fundraising and perpetuating it. The only way to combat those keyboard warriors was for community members to form private groups online and fight back.
Ryan Vizzions

Ryan Vizzions

03/06/2017
Ryan Vizzions (a.k.a. Red Hawk) had the Standing Rock Rising Facebook page. He also has the AModernGhost.com website. He took photos of the protest over many months. His photos were dramatic and, in the last days, you'll notice they were carefully framed so that you did not see the massive amounts of garbage in the camp. The narrative he clearly wanted to present, which is seen repeatedly in all of his shots, was the big bad police/military against peaceful Native Americans. He did not show the crime, drug abuse, and protesters engaging in violence against the police. Vizzions was not completely well-received by all protest participants, and as you can see in the screenshots, he cultivates a narrative of his own about himself. He is obsessed with race, and can't stop evoking white guilt and racial reasoning into everything. He's quick to point to his publication in national magazines as proof of his validity as a photographer, but what he doesn't show in his photos is as telling as what he did. Much like the other "alternative" truth-tellers who flocked to this protest, his work was about propaganda. His images were widely used (sometimes without his permission, to his frustration as you can read) to support a false narrative which was, one could assume, his goal. Even after the camps cleared out and the tribe didn't want protesters there, he was still lecturing local residents online about their ignorance of their own state and history, and lack of education, that he, the outsider, had.
Sophia Wilansky

Sophia Wilansky

02/28/2017
Sophia Wilansky quickly became a rallying cry for protesters after her arm injury on November 20 at Backwater Bridge. She claimed the injury was due to a grenade thrown by law enforcement. Law enforcement said they did not use the type of grenades she described. Law enforcement collected items from the scene, allegedly including burned propane bottles with human tissue suggesting a possible incendiary device had been created by someone and had exploded. Federal law enforcement collected evidence, and a grand jury was convened regarding this incident. Some leaked information suggests a case is being built against Wilansky regarding the possible creation of an incendiary device to be used against law enforcement that night. Molotov cocktails had been used in previous conflicts against law enforcement, and the high rate of propane canister purchase in the cities of Bismarck and Mandan had raised concerns and did not go unnoticed by both law enforcement and citizens alike. In May of 2017, Wilansky and her father (a lawyer) announced on Facebook that they were beginning the process of filing multiple lawsuits against any North Dakota entity remotely connected to the incident.
Patrick Millette

Patrick Millette

02/28/2017
Patrick Millette, from Lilburn, Georgia, was a "keyboard warrior". He spent months attacking various North Dakota law enforcement Facebook pages, encouraging others to call and harass as well as leaving comments on Facebook Pages that weren't locked down well. He went after individuals and also after businesses online, published the personal addresses and phone numbers of private citizens, and more. Millette was one of the worst cowardly trolls online. He would make fake profiles of people and then block them so that they could not remove them easily or report him.


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